More TK7 Go panel videos from Dave Kelly

Dave Kelly continues to make videos that explore different sections of the TK7 Go panel. Rather than trying to cover everything the panel does, Dave focuses on one or two methods for making and using masks, and then demonstrates different options within the panel for fine-tuning and using that mask.

The key to deciding which mask to use is usually dictated by the what you’re trying to select. If the brightness or the darkness of a particular element is its defining characteristic, then a luminosity mask or zone mask will be an effective starting point. Luminosity masks are probably best if you’re looking to target light tones or dark tones INCLUDING the whitest whites and the blackest blacks. Zone masks, however, are better at targeting the light gray, dark gray, and midtone gray tones that EXCLUDE pure white and pure black. If the defining characteristic of the element to be selected is color, then infinity color masks are a good starting point since they allow very targeted masks based on color.

Keep in mind that the first mask choice is not necessarily going to be the perfect mask. Modifying the mask is usually helpful for improving it. The TK7 Go panel has options for fine-tuning the initial mask choice, and the MODIFY section provides additional controls. These options often make significant improvements to the initial mask. The desired elements can be better selected (made whiter in the mask preview) and parts of the image that should not be selected can be made darker or even black. Properly modifying the mask is an important second step in order to better sculpt the mask to fit your particular image.

In the first video below, Dave focuses on using zone masks to make adjustments to different tonal ranges in the image. At the beginning, he takes a close look at how the Go module’s mask controls work using a step-tablet image of the different zones. Seeing what the different zone mask sliders do on this control image makes it easier to understand what they’re doing in the more complex setting like an actual photograph. (You can download Dave’s step-tablet image here.) Dave includes three different examples of using zone masks to adjust brightness in specific parts of the image. Zone masks are one of my favorite techniques since they are so precise at selecting the initial tone and then can be easily adjusted to be even more specific.

In the second video below, Dave uses both luminosity and zone masks to make gentle adjustments to the image. This video emphasizes the experimental nature of creating these masks. Sometimes a luminosity mask works better and sometimes a zone mask works better. It may not be entirely obvious which will work best until you try both and see. In addition to experimenting with different types of masks, Dave also uses different mask controls, like the different color channels for luminosity masks and the sliders for zone masks, to fine-tune the initial selection. Then, to take it a step further, he uses the MODIFY section of the Go module to add contrast to the mask and to paint out some areas with black paint to make an even better selection of his chosen subject. These types of adjustments quickly become second nature since you actually see the mask on-screen and can make modifications based on how the mask looks.

In the final video below, Dave looks at making adjustments using infinity color masks. Color masks add an entirely new dimension to the masking process. Unlike luminosity masks (which are based on pixel brightness), hue and saturation are the two pixel values that determine what gets selected with infinity color masks. Things that would be impossible to select based on brightness are sometimes very easy to select based on color. As with luminosity and zone masks, color masks also offer specific mask controls for choosing the hue range, mask brightness, and color feathering. And, of course, the MODIFY section can again be used to make even more precise masks. The one caveat when choosing to use infinity color masks is to make sure the colors are colorful. Unsaturated colors can still be selected, but the masks will be quite dark, even in the selected pixels. Saturated colors definitely produce brighter masks.

The big takeaway in Dave’s latest videos is that there is no preset way to use luminosity, zone, and color masks. The characteristics of the image will determine the best place to start, but the panel’s ability to quickly adjust and modify the initial mask also plays an important role in generating the best mask for a desired adjustment. Some experimentation may be necessary, but with a little practice, it’s easy to generate a targeted, perfectly-feather mask with just a few mouse clicks. I think you’ll enjoy Dave’s latest videos. Be sure give them a thumbs-up and consider subscribing to his YouTube channel to get the latest updates.

2 thoughts on “More TK7 Go panel videos from Dave Kelly

  1. Good job you guys!

    On Fri, Apr 30, 2021, 6:24 AM Good Light Journal wrote:

    > Tony Kuyper posted: ” Dave Kelly continues to make videos that explore > different sections of the TK7 Go panel. Rather than trying to cover > everything the panel does, Dave focuses on one or two methods for making > and using masks, and then demonstrates different options ” >

    Like

  2. Hello Tony,

    Always good to hear from you and read your messageā€¦ which always works out to be timely.

    Thanks again,

    Guy

    >

    Like

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