Infinity color mask magic

As I was adding infinity color masks to the TK7 panel, Sean Bagshaw was busy recording his Sean’s Favorite Photoshop Techniques, Volume 2 series. The download folder for that series contains lots of good color images, and I experimented with some to make sure the new infinity color masks offered something useful and unique for other people’s images, not just my own. They do, and I sent some quick edits to Sean to show him how I’d used the masks on his images.

Sean took these tests and incorporated them into the Quick Tip video below. And, not surprisingly, he’s gone well beyond my own attempts at using the masks and came up with some innovative ways to take infinity color masks to the next level.

This video is a little longer than the other Quick Tips, but it moves fast. Sean covers the basics of using infinity color masks and then demonstrates using them on six different images. Here are some things to pay close attention to as you watch the video:

  • Try to choose a color that actually has some decent color. Remember, these are color-based masks, and if you choose a weak color (low saturation), you’ll get a weak (dark) mask. When creating an infinity color mask, the Color Picker eyedropper extracts the hue value of the selected pixels to build the mask around. The saturation levels of that hue in the image then determines the brightness of the mask. This means that low-saturated colors will still be dark in the mask. So, as much as possible, click on colorful colors to make the best and brightest masks.
  • The initial mask preview is extremely accurate, but modification can sometimes create an even better mask. One of the great features with for infinity color masks is that you get to choose the color from the image and the mask is built around that selection. As such, the original mask preview is always on target, and in several of his examples, where this initial mask is essentially perfect, Sean just uses it as is to adjust the image. At other times, though, he first experiments with adjusting the color range or modifying the mask using the tools in the MODIFY section of the RapidMask module. MODIFY is especially helpful for darker masks where a less-saturated color was the target for generating the infinity color mask preview. The key to success in all cases is to start with a mask properly focused on a specific color selected from the image. And since this is the core process for generating an infinity color mask, the initial mask is always a great starting point. Once it’s available, there are lots of opportunities to customize the mask depending on what you’d like to do to your image.
  • Infinity color masks aren’t just for color adjustments. One of the things that really comes through in watching Sean work on these images is the variety of different techniques he employs. Infinity color masks are used to adjust color, saturation, brightness, and contrast. And he uses them with Curves, Levels, Hue/Saturation, Brightness/Contrast, and Solid Color adjustment layers to achieve the desired effect. This illustrates a good point, I think. To really get the most out of these infinity “color” masks it’s necessary to let go of the “color” concept and simply start seeing them as new precision masks for making targeted adjustments. Just like luminosity masks can be used to make adjustments other than brightness, infinity color masks aren’t restricted to adjusting color. When you start seeing these different types of pixel-based masks as a continuum of masking possibilities, the full power of what they can do really starts to take shape.

If you have Sean’s Favorite Photoshop Techniques, Volume 2 video series, you might want to go into the practice images folder and follow along with what he’s doing here. Working along with Sean will help you see where and how you might be able to apply infinity color masks to your own images.

Finally, just a quick reminder that everything on my website’s Panels & Videos page, including the TK7 panel with infinity color masks and Sean’s Favorite Photoshop Techniques, Volume 2, is 20% off through the month of September with the following discount code: Update20

Be sure to subscribe to Sean’s YouTube channel for more great tips on photography and post-processing including those listed below.
Infinity color masks
Linked vs. unlinked smart objects
Three ways to use Levels and Curves
Reusing saved luminosity masks
Developing a quality night sky
Split toning
Cloud sculpting
Exposure blending
Favorite new V6 features

Sean Bagshaw’s TK7 workflow

“It’s not as hard as I thought.”

That was the reaction of a friend in my local camera club after he bought the TK7 panel and watched Sean Bagshaw’s TK7 Video Guide. Earlier he had told me the panel looked too complicated, but after watching Sean’s videos, he definitely seemed more confident that he would be able to use it successfully

I think this is a normal thought process many photographers go through when they first encounter the panel. They’re curious about luminosity masks, but also a bit anxious as to whether they can successfully integrate them into their workflow. And the panel with all its buttons can seem a bit daunting initially. It’s sort of like the first time you get a computer or a smart phone. There’s some apprehension just looking at the controls, but once you start using it, it quickly starts to make sense. The TK7 panel is pretty much the same. It can be a bit intimidating to look at, but with a little practice, you realize it offers a lot of control over what you want to accomplish with your images.

Sean Bagshaw has been helping photographers feel comfortable with my luminosity mask panels for over six years. His videos break them down button-by-button with expert commentary and demonstrations as to how everything works. And his measured style is just like your favorite teacher who took the time to make sure you understood a concept before moving onto a new topic.

The video below is the portion of his complete workflow chapter from the TK7 Video Guide series where he uses the TK7 panel to finish an image. In addition to showcasing Sean’s teaching style, it also demonstrates some important concepts about using the panel.

  • It integrates easily in to the workflow at many different levels. It makes complex masks but it also efficiently executes basic Photoshop functions.
  • You don’t have to use every button to use it successfully. There is a lot of functionality in the panel, but you can choose just those features you need for your image.
  • Not all experiments are successful. The panel is a great way to try different things with with masks, but, if something isn’t working, well, no problem. The panel also makes it easy to try something else.
  • You’ll never outgrow it. As your skills improve, the TK7 panel will continue to provide new opportunities to explore different ways of using pixel-based masks in your workflow.

If you haven’t seen this video yet, I think you’ll enjoy watching Sean use it on an image. And while he’s certainly an expert at using the TK7 panel, this level of proficiency is easy to attain. With just a little practice, anyone can be a luminosity mask master.

The TK7 panel and the TK7 Video Guide are available on the Panels & Videos page.

V5 Quick Tip #3: Luminosity Mask Basics And The V5 Intro Module

In Sean Bagshaw’s newest TKActions V5 Quick Tip video, he takes a closer look at the Intro module. For those just starting out with Photoshop masks, he also provides a brief review of how masks control what is revealed in the layer. Luminosity masks are just like other masks except that their grayscale values are determined by the tones of individual image pixels. This prevents halos and other obvious edges when using luminosity masks to reveal adjustments in the image. Sean explains how the Intro module quickly makes all the basic luminosity masks, how the user can evaluate them, and how to create adjustment layers with the chosen luminosity mask in place as the layer mask. If you are new to these techniques, the Intro module provides an easy way to quickly add luminosity masks your workflow.

V5 Quick Tip #1: Basic Luminosity Mask Tasks
V5 Quick Tip #2: Modifying Masks

V5 Quick Tip #2: Modifying Masks

Sean Bagshaw continues his TKActions V5 Quick Tip series with a closer look at mask modification. Even though the V5 panel can generate hundreds of standard masks (Lights/Darks/Zones), the best mask is often one customized specifically for the image by the photographer. A full range of mask-modification functions is built into the V5 panel to insure that the perfect mask is always just a few clicks away. Sean shows how easy this is while discussing his thought process behind his choices.

If you missed the first episode, it covers the basics of viewing and selecting luminosity masks and adding them to adjustment layers.

Hope you enjoy these. If you have other V5 topics you’d like to see covered, please leave them in the comments section below.