Sneak peek: Luminosity Mask Masterclass

Sean Bagshaw finished his Luminosity Mask Masterclass video series and currently plans to release it in November, soon after he returns from taking pictures. This new course is a major update to his Complete Guide to Luminosity Masks, 2nd edition series, currently on sale for $5 on the panels and videos page. That older series is now five-years-old, and pixel-based masks (like luminosity masks) have advanced considerably in that time. New masks, new methods, and a new TK7 panel are all available. I’ve been watching the new course and thoroughly enjoying it. It clocks in at nearly 5 hours and is packed with information. Fortunately, Sean has it organized in to compact chapters, so it’s possible to skip around and choose topics that interest you most, instead of watching it straight through. One of the chapters, with a brief introduction by Sean, is linked below.

Luminosity Mask Masterclass will provide a timely and comprehensive update on using multiple types of pixel-based masks, and I’m sure you’ll find it useful. More information coming soon.

TK Quick Tip: Layer Mask mode

One of the best features in the TK7 panel is the ability to view luminosity masks and other pixel-based masks as fast as they’re created. Seeing the actual mask up front allows you to make an initial assessment of what will be revealed and what will be concealed before the mask is actually put into use. It also allows you to modify the mask to make sure it selects the parts of the image you want selected.

When you actually deploy the mask, though, sometimes it’s not quite doing what it was expected to do. Maybe a different mask would have worked better. Or maybe the current mask is pretty good, but still needs additional modification. It’s occasionally hard to know how a particular mask is going to perform until you actually see how it affects the image.

If the mask you created using the TK7 panel was applied as a layer mask, then there’s no need to start all over. The TK7 panel has “Layer Mask mode” that lets you modify layers masks or even change to a totally different mask without going through the process of generating and applying a new mask.

In the video below, Sean Bagshaw covers three situations where Layer Mask mode comes in handy.

  • Changing to a different mask entirely.
  • Modifying the current layer mask.
  • Exposure-blending to control dynamic range.

The key feature in all these examples is that the image itself drives the decision-making process. In Layer Mask mode, you no longer see the mask since it automatically gets applied as a layer mask to the active layer. What you see instead is the effect the mask has on the image. So in layer Mask Mode you’re choosing the mask based on how the image looks and not on how the mask looks. You can still look at the mask if you want to, but you’ll also be able to instantly see how the mask affects the image. As always, Sean does an excellent job walking you through the process. I hope you’ll give it a try.

TK Quick Tip: Mask-the-Rapid-Mask

In the video below, Sean Bagshaw reviews the new blur features in the Mask-the-Rapid-Mask option in the MODIFY section of the TK7 RapidMask module. This addition is a request I received from a users who wanted more control over this process. Mask-the-Rapid-Mask lets you localize the effect a luminosity mask has on an image while the mask is being created.

The Lasso tool is a common starting point for choosing the specific parts of the image where you want the luminosity mask adjustment applied. In order to avoid a hard edge to the selection (that might be visible in the image), the Mask-the-Rapid-Mask action now opens the Feather Selection dialog. The panel calculates a generous feather radius based on the size of the image, but users are given the chance to adjust this. Unfortunately, Photoshop doesn’t preview feathering, so you might want to experiment when you start using this feature to get a sense as to whether you prefer more or less feathering than is suggested. Clicking “OK” in the Feather Selection window completes the action and applies the selection as a mask to the Rapid Mask.

At other times, users already have a dedicated selection they want to use and would prefer no feathering at all. The action also accommodates this. Simply click the “Cancel” button in the Feather Selection dialog and the selection mask is applied with no additional feathering.

Sean covers both possibilities in his video.

Be sure to subscribe to Sean’s YouTube channel for more great tips on photography and post-processing including those listed below.
Mask-the-Rapid-Mask modification
“My Channels” masks
Infinity color masks
Linked vs. unlinked smart objects
Three ways to use Levels and Curves
Reusing saved luminosity masks
Developing a quality night sky
Split toning
Cloud sculpting
Exposure blending

TK Quick Tip: “My Channels” masks

Sean Bashaw has another great quick tip on one of the new features in the TK7 RapidMask module. “My Channels” allows any selection, layer mask, or alpha channel to become a Rapid Mask. Previously, the RapidMask module only supported masks created by the module itself. Now, “My Channels” allows user-created masks and selections to be quickly brought into the Rapid Mask process. Once incorporated, they can serve as the starting point for making Lights, Darks, Midtone, and Zone masks. These personal masks can also be modified using the module’s MODIFY section, and output using any of the buttons in the OUTPUT section. So if you want to make a luminosity mask, color mask, saturation/vibrance mask, or use your own mask or selection, the TK7 RapidMask module now handles all these different options with ease.

To start using “My Channels” simply click the Channel > My Channels option in the SOURCE section of the updated RapidMask module.

3-D Color Model

Your document is scanned for available masks and selections and the results are displayed in a new window that appears on the module.

3-D Color Model

Then just click a button to turn that item into the new Rapid Mask. From there, all the other features in the RapidMask module, including the mask calculator, can be used with it.

“My Channels” means that ANY mask or selection can now power the Rapid Mask engine. Or, to put it another way, every mask and selection is now a Rapid Mask waiting to happen. Some wonderful new masking options are available as a result. Sean provides a good overview of what’s possible in the video below.

Be sure to subscribe to Sean’s YouTube channel for more great tips on photography and post-processing including those listed below.
“My Channels” masks
Infinity color masks
Linked vs. unlinked smart objects
Three ways to use Levels and Curves
Reusing saved luminosity masks
Developing a quality night sky
Split toning
Cloud sculpting
Exposure blending
Favorite new V6 features