Free Update: TK8-beta

With the release of Photoshop 22.3.0 in March 2021, users of Mac computers with the M1 chip now have an ARM-based version of Photoshop that runs natively on the new chip. Adobe claims increased speed for this version of Photoshop, and from watching it perform via internet screen-sharing, it does appear to be noticeably faster.

This new ARM-based version of Photoshop only supports Photoshop extensions (now called “plugins” by Adobe) that use Adobe’s UXP plugin architecture. The older CEP architecture is still supported if Photoshop is run in Intel emulation mode, i.e. Rosetta, but this sacrifices the optimization and speed Adobe has developed for the M1 chip.

The current TK7 panel was developed using the older CEP architecture since that was all that was available at the time. However, I started UXP coding in July 2020, and the TK Lum-Mask plugin released last October used it. Based on what I learned developing that plugin, I planned to convert TK7 to the UXP format also. However, once I started this process, I knew that simply recreating TK7 using the new UXP architecture wasn’t going to cut it. UXP lets me do new things, so why not push further? And so, the idea for TK8 quickly came into focus. The general layout of TK7 would be maintained in TK8 to make the transition as easy as possible, but there would be new functions, new actions, new masks, bigger buttons, better options, and faster response. TK7 would be a conceptual foundation, but TK8 would be a next-generation plugin, better than anything that came before.

Months into the process, TK8 is on target to live up to expectations. I’m really excited by it and hope to have it available later this year. However, ARM-based Photoshop is here now, and Mac M1 users need a plugin that utilizes the new UXP architecture now. So, TK8-beta is being released now to accommodate them. It has almost all the functions of the current TK7 panel plus a few of the new features planned for TK8. And, while the Mac M1 is the main reason for releasing TK8-beta at this time, the new plugin also works on all computers running Photoshop 2021. Intel-based Mac and Windows computers can install TK8-beta the same as M1 Macs. So even if you don’t have a Mac M1 computer, you can still try out TK8 to see where things are headed. Both TK7 and TK8-beta can be installed simultaneously, so you can choose which you’d like to use.

New features available in TK8-beta compared to TK7 include:

  • Optional “always on” tooltips
  • Cleaner user interface with bigger buttons
  • Expanded web-sharpening options
  • Improved Layer Mask mode to allow rapidly trying different luminosity masks as layer masks
  • New method for adding user actions
  • Ability to add unlimited user actions to the Combo and Cx modules
  • More obvious selection indicators
  • New mask modification options

However, this is a beta version of TK8. It’s is still being developed and Adobe is also still developing the UXP architecture as well. So, while I see the potential of TK8, I’m also aware of some limitations.

  • No written instruction manual or video documentation. There are extensive tooltips coded into all buttons and sliders and much of the TK7 literature applies equally well to TK8-beta, but there is no definitive resource that covers the different elements and how they work.
  • English-only. Multiple languages are once again planned from the product version of TK8, but translation happens near the end of the development process and will be added later.
  • All UXP plugins have a “focus” issue as discussed on this thread. They steal focus from Photoshop so that keyboard shortcuts don’t always work after clicking on a UXP plugin. This is an issue Adobe is aware of and plans to fix, but it can be annoying. NOTE: Clicking on the Options bar restores focus to Photoshop.
  • Can’t rule out bugs. While I’ve been testing TK8 extensively, it’s all new code, which means there’s the possibility I’ve missed something. However, releasing an early beta version means that anyone using the plugin can contribute to making it better. Simply contact me if you find something that doesn’t work or could be improved.

TK8-beta is free for all customers who have previously downloaded TK7 version 2. The download server has already sent an email with the necessary files. Check your email (including the junk/spam folder) if you already have TK7 version 2 that was released in July 2020. Additionally, TK8-beta is now included in the download folder for TK7. So you can also use your original “TK7 (updated)” download link to get a new download folder that contains the installer for TK8-beta.

TK8-beta will give you an idea of what to expect when the product version is available later in 2021. It’s continuing to evolve and already has several new features beyond what’s included in this beta version. I hope you’ll give it a try and provide feedback on any problems encountered or additional features that would be useful.

More TK7 videos from Dave Kelly

Dave Kelly has continued to create video content about the TK7 panel on his YouTube channel, The Joy of Editing. One of the themes he’s exploring is how to use the different masks available in the Go module. The Go module was the new mask generator in last year’s TK7 update and it’s part of an evolution to simplify the mask making-process. The videos below are his most recent ones that take a look at using the Go module.


Dodging and burning is covered in the first video linked below. This is one of the most fundamental and powerful ways to us luminosity masks. The mask essentially creates a stencil, and painting through this stencil in the form of a Photoshop selection deposits either black paint for burning or white paint for dodging precisely on those parts of the image where it’s intended to have an effect. Multiple brush strokes can be used to intensify the effect in certain parts of the image and not others, and even colored paint can be applied, so it’s possible to burn and dodge with color. There is a lot of creative flexibility when burning and dodging through luminosity mask selections, and it’s a technique that can be used on almost every image.


In the next video, Dave looks at combining luminosity masks with Photoshop plug-ins like Topaz Studio. This is a really interesting application of luminosity masks and it makes perfect sense. Luminosity masks, because they are based on pixel-level data, provide perfectly feathered edges. So blending in a Topaz adjustment is very much like exposure-blending with luminosity masks. In both cases there is a seamless blend creating a natural transition between the different effects.


In the third episode of the series on using the Go module, Dave runs through several processing steps on three different images. What I really like about this episode is Dave’s experimental approach to incorporating the masks in his workflow, and experimentation is a very important part of the creative process. It’s sometimes easy to forget that generating luminosity and other pixel-level masks would be hopelessly inefficient if we had to do it manually. The Go module completely removes this barrier by making a huge variety of masks available at the click of a button. Dave shows that it’s easy to experiment and find the right mask and then apply it to achieve the desired outcome. This video also features luminosity masks being used on monochrome images. Luminosity masks have a reputation for being best suited for color landscape and nature photography. The reality is they can be used with ANY photograph, and monochrome, especially, can benefit from their ability to isolate specific tonal ranges in the image.


I find Dave’s videos enjoyable to watch as they reflect a real-world application of the panel. No one is going to use every feature in the different modules, but there’s a high likelihood that certain features will be incredibly useful. It all depends on what you’re looking to do with an image, and Dave provides plenty of ideas for incorporating different functions into the workflow.

Since many people will find Dave Kelly’s videos useful, I reached out to him and provided a discount code that he’s included in his video descriptions on YouTube. It’s works on all items on the Panels & Videos page.

TK7 Go Module: A video by Dave Kelly

“The Joy of Editing” is a YouTube channel run by Dave Kelly, and he recently uploaded a video featuring luminosity masks and the TK7 Go module. He explains the basic features of how to use it, and photographers familiar with the panel may already know some of what he demonstrates. However, he does make especially good use of the module’s Zone masks in this video. Zone masks were completely changed in the Go module compared to the Zone masks in the RapidMask module, and they’re possibly underutilized. Dave uses them as layer masks on Curves adjustment layers, but I also find them useful for burning and dodging after loading them as a selection. If you’ve not experimented the Zone masks in the Go module, hopefully seeing what Dave does in this video will provide some incentive and confidence to give them a try.

Sean Bagshaw on the PhotoPills channel

Sean Bagshaw appeared on the PhotoPills YouTube channel recently. He had a conversation with Rafael Pons from the PhotoPills team that covered Sean’s personal history, his approach to taking pictures, and then four image workflows where Sean demonstrated various ways he uses Photoshop and luminosity masks to develop images. It covers a lot of territory. The processing workflows start at 30 minutes in, but the initial conversation also provides valuable insight on how to create images that are personally satisfying. It’s interesting and fun to watch but maybe grab a bowl of popcorn first as the total runtime is a little over two hours. Also, be sure to check out the PhotoPills app. It’s a great way to plan landscape images that perfectly align with the sun, moon, and stars.