TKActions V5 Quick Tip #7 – Rapid Mask Module: Normal vs. Auto-Apply Mode

Sean Bagshaw has another new V5 Quick Tip video and this time he takes a closer look at the RapidMask module. There are two ways to use this module: normal mode and auto-apply. Normal mode allows the user to quickly see the different masks as they’re generated. This is the real-time, mask-based interface introduced with the V5 panel that allows users to make intelligent choices about which mask to use. Auto-apply mode provides an image-based approach to mask selection. With auto-apply, the masks are again quickly generated in the background, but instead of being viewed on-screen, they are automatically applied as a layer mask on the active layer. Which mask works best is determined by what makes the image look best. Sean demonstrates these two methods of working with the RapidMask module and how to combine them. In addition to showing how these functions work with the regular spectrum of masks, Sean also explains how modifying the mask in either mode can help create the optimal mask for the image.

These techniques are very much at the heart of using luminosity masks successfully. Both normal mode and auto-apply have a place in the development workflow, and the V5 panel is designed to make these methods quick and accessible. Sean’s video shows how easy it is to switch back and forth with these techniques in order to achieve the best results.

V5 Quick Tip #7: Rapid Mask Module: Normal vs. Auto-Apply Mode
V5 Quick Tip #6: Masking A Mask
V5 Quick Tip #5: Dodging, Burning and Luminosity Painting
V5 Quick Tip #4: Off-Center Midtone Masks
V5 Quick Tip #3: Luminosity Mask Basics and the V5 Intro Module
V5 Quick Tip #2: Modifying Masks
V5 Quick Tip #1: Basic Luminosity Mask Tasks

TKActions V5 Quick Tip #6: Masking a Mask

Sean Bagshaw’s newest V5 Quick Tip reviews the “masking a mask” technique. Luminosity masks offer unique ways to make targeted and easily blended tonal changes in the image, but they select tones throughout the image, not specific elements. This can sometimes lead to adjustments affecting parts of the image where a change is not desired. For example, when adjusting tones in the sky through a luminosity layer mask, similar tones in the non-sky parts of the image can be unintentionally altered. While it would be possible to paint black on the luminosity layer mask to conceal the unintended changes, this is also a destructive process that potentially ruins the luminosity layer mask in case parts of it need to be revealed later on.

A better solution is to put the adjustment layer inside a group, and then paint on the group’s layer mask to reveal the desired parts of the adjustment in the image. Sean demonstrates this method using the new black-masked group layer option that was released in the most recent upgrade of the V5 panel. Masking-the-mask allows significant changes to certain elements in the image while also protecting other parts.

V5 Quick Tip #6: Masking A Mask
V5 Quick Tip #5: Dodging, Burning and Luminosity Painting
V5 Quick Tip #4: Off-Center Midtone Masks
V5 Quick Tip #3: Luminosity Mask Basics and the V5 Intro Module
V5 Quick Tip #2: Modifying Masks
V5 Quick Tip #1: Basic Luminosity Mask Tasks

TKActions V5 Quick Tip #5: Dodging, Burning, and Luminosity Painting

Luminosity painting has always been one of my favorite methods for using luminosity masks. Painting through luminosity selections has significantly more power to influence image tone than using luminosity masks as layer masks, especially when it comes to burning and dodging. Not only does luminosity painting target specific tones in the image to receive paint, but paint can be applied repeatedly with multiple brushstrokes to enhance the effect. Luminosity layer masks limit what can be achieved by what the mask will reveal. Luminosity painting does not have this constraint. Paint can be applied repeatedly even through partially selected pixels until maximum white or maximum black is achieved if necessary. Plus, the active luminosity selection insures it all blends in with the rest of the image regardless of how much paint is applied. So there is much greater effect possible with luminosity painting on burn/dodge layers compared to using layer masks. Not all images need the enhanced effect that luminosity painting can achieve, but using it instead of a luminosity layer mask insures that dynamic control isn’t throttled by what a layer mask can reveal.

Sean’s newest quick tip video shows how easy and precise luminosity painting can be with the V5 panel. Highlights with contrast and shadows with depth can quickly be painted into an image using this technique. I particularly like the way Sean uses the “Pick” tool to find the best off-center midtone (Zone) mask to paint through. This is definitely one of my favorite tips so far since it’s something I use on almost every image. I hope you enjoy it too. Be sure to subscribe to Sean’s YouTube channel to keep up with his latest technique videos.

V5 Quick Tip #5: Dodging, Burning and Luminosity Painting
V5 Quick Tip #4: Off-Center Midtone Masks
V5 Quick Tip #3: Luminosity Mask Basics and the V5 Intro Module
V5 Quick Tip #2: Modifying Masks
V5 Quick Tip #1: Basic Luminosity Mask Tasks

V5 Quick Tip #4: Off-Center Midtone Masks

Sean Bagshaw’s newest TKActions V5 Quick Tip looks at off-center midtone masks, also referred to as Zone masks. These are some of my favorite luminosity masks. The standard Lights and Darks masks always include either the lightest lights or the darkest darks, and using them can sometimes gray-down the whites or gray-up the blacks. Zone masks effectively eliminate the blacks and whites from the mask and thereby allow midtone values to be adjusted independently. Zones 2-1/2 and Zone 7-1/2 are a couple masks I often try. Zone 2-1/2 for adjusting the dark midtones and Zone 7-1/2 for the light midtones. However, the V5 panel includes presets for 21 different Zone masks, so there are lots of options. Zone masks can also be modified to make them more or less inclusive using the V5’s modification buttons. The V5 panel makes it easy to quickly craft a Zone mask and to put it work

Sean’s new video tip covers choosing the right mask, modifying it, and then painting it to make it just right for a particular image. If you’ve not experimented with Zone masks, I’m sure this video will provide incentive to try. With a little practice, Zone masks can be extremely helpful when developing images in Photoshop.

V5 Quick Tip #4: Off-Center Midtone Masks
V5 Quick Tip #3: Luminosity Mask Basics and the V5 Intro Module
V5 Quick Tip #2: Modifying Masks
V5 Quick Tip #1: Basic Luminosity Mask Tasks

TKActions V5 panel

V5 Quick Tip #3: Luminosity Mask Basics And The V5 Intro Module

In Sean Bagshaw’s newest TKActions V5 Quick Tip video, he takes a closer look at the Intro module. For those just starting out with Photoshop masks, he also provides a brief review of how masks control what is revealed in the layer. Luminosity masks are just like other masks except that their grayscale values are determined by the tones of individual image pixels. This prevents halos and other obvious edges when using luminosity masks to reveal adjustments in the image. Sean explains how the Intro module quickly makes all the basic luminosity masks, how the user can evaluate them, and how to create adjustment layers with the chosen luminosity mask in place as the layer mask. If you are new to these techniques, the Intro module provides an easy way to quickly add luminosity masks your workflow.

V5 Quick Tip #1: Basic Luminosity Mask Tasks
V5 Quick Tip #2: Modifying Masks

V5 Quick Tip #2: Modifying Masks

Sean Bagshaw continues his TKActions V5 Quick Tip series with a closer look at mask modification. Even though the V5 panel can generate hundreds of standard masks (Lights/Darks/Zones), the best mask is often one customized specifically for the image by the photographer. A full range of mask-modification functions is built into the V5 panel to insure that the perfect mask is always just a few clicks away. Sean shows how easy this is while discussing his thought process behind his choices.

If you missed the first episode, it covers the basics of viewing and selecting luminosity masks and adding them to adjustment layers.

Hope you enjoy these. If you have other V5 topics you’d like to see covered, please leave them in the comments section below.