Skip to content

Infinity Monochromes

September 7, 2016
pair-of-queens-final

NOTE: A folder of smaller PSD documents for the images used in this blog can be downloaded here.

Like many photographers, I love good black and white images.  Not only do they create a connection with the earlier incarnation of the art form, but there is also a certain elegance to monochrome images when they’re done right.  The lack of color creates immediate abstraction since a color-free world is not what we normally see.  Texture, form, and line are elevated and so we engage with the composition at a different level.  Black and white images remind us that color can sometimes be a distraction.  There is deep beauty in the monochrome world, though it is often hard to see with our color-adapted eyes.

Unfortunately, my skill in making black and white images does not match my appreciation for viewing them.  I struggle to get the tones properly balanced in my prints.  There seems to be two competing problems.  One is too much gray.  The image may have a full range of tones, from black to white, but if the midtones predominate, then the image frequently looks gray . . . and quite dull.  The solution to “too much gray” is to increase contrast.  But this then leads to the second problem:  textureless shadows and highlights.  As contrast is increased, detail is lost in the shadows and highlights.  Texture is critical to black and white.  If the shadows are blocked or the highlights are merely light gray without definition, the image has a posterization quality with large areas of uninteresting dark and light tones.  So it’s a fine balance with black and white, and it can take some effort to avoid too much gray in the midtones while maintaining appropriate texture in the shadows and highlights.

I’ve dabbled in black and white processing from time to time, experimenting with the different methods offered by Photoshop and Lightroom.  Recently I’ve started using the “Pixels” output of from the TK Infinity Mask panel as another alternative.  This “Pixels” button creates a pixel layer of the black and white infinity mask on the Layers panel, which basically constitutes a conversion of the color image to black and white.  As I’ve started to understand it better, it’s provided some unique opportunities.  Originally, I saw the “Pixels” option as an interesting feature to include in the panel, though I wasn’t sure how useful it would be.  The panel, after all, was designed to make masks to aid other developing tasks; it wasn’t meant to actually create images.  However, the panel’s sliders turned out to have some direct correlations to black and white images, and they provide an interesting approach to solving the problems listed above.

pixels-output

Before getting started with this discussion, there are a couple important points to cover.  The first is the necessity of properly setting the RGB and Gray working spaces in Photoshop’s color settings dialog (Edit > Color Settings).  In order for the “Pixels” output layer to match the panel’s preview infinity mask, the RGB and Gray working spaces must be properly aligned.  The two most common pairings are as follows:

  • RGB: ProPhoto RGB needs to be paired with Gray: Gray Gamma 1.8.
  • RGB: Adobe RGB (1998) needs to be paired with Gray: Gray Gamma 2.2.

If the RGB and Gray working spaces are not matched, there will be a brightness shift between the mask previewed by the Infinity Mask panel and the “Pixels” output on the Layers panel.

The second point is a reminder that the “Pixels” output option is bit-depth neutral.  If the original image is 16-bit, then the mask generated by the Infinity Mask panel is also 16-bit.  But even more important is the fact that the pixel layer created via “Pixels” output is an identical 16-bit copy of the preview mask (provided that the RGB and Gray working spaces have been properly set).  The process of converting the mask to pixels does not involve an intervening 8-bit selection that compresses the grayscale data.  So even though the grayscale mask discards the color information in the image, the bit-depth of pixel-level brightness data is maintained.

Below is the first image I experimented with using “Pixels” output for conversion to black and white.  Rolling the mouse over the image shows the final result. (NOTE: It may take a couple of seconds for the rollover image to load, but once it does, flicking the mouse back and forth across the image edge instantantly changes the image. Also, rollover images might not appear in the email feed but do work on the blog website.)  I did not record the settings I used to create this, and it’s largely unimportant.  The Infinity Mask panel is meant to be a place to experiment so see what works.  Different color channels, different tones, and different slider settings can all be easily tried to achieve the best outcome.  The “Pixels” output was really just a foundation in this case.  It provided the initial color-to-black-and-white conversion.  From there, additional masks and layers were added to arrive at the final image.  But the conversion step was pivotal in guiding the image to its final form.  The key in this case was using the Infinity Mask panel to find a TONE that looked best as white in the image, and then using the other sliders to manipulate the brightness values of the other tones and, in the process, remove the distracting background elements.


The second experimental image is shown below.  Again, a rather uninteresting color image but one where the repeating lines and shapes might work well in black and white.  The rollover shows the final presentation.


This image helped me better understand some of the fundamental relationships between the Infinity Mask panel’s controls and the monochrome image.  Specifically the sliders.

The TONE slider determines which tone in the image will appear as white in the mask and therefore also white in the “Pixels” output.  A “Lights-1” setting (TONE = 255) is a good starting point, but TONE values from 180 and up can be useful as experiments.  The lower numbers help to open the highlights in the image which can then be further manipulated by the other sliders.

RANGE  =  Black Point.  The RANGE slider determines the tonal width of the mask with the chosen TONE value as the center, whitest value.  By decreasing the RANGE value (pulling the slider left), tones more distant from the chosen tone go to black.  Some pure black in a black and white image often provides a good tonal foundation.  The RANGE slider can help determine where the black begins.

FOCUS = Midtone Contrast.  The FOCUS slider was designed to decrease the sometimes excessive feathering that is a natural part of luminosity masks.  It does this by increasing tonal slope around the 50% gray value in the mask.  In practical terms, this means that increasing FOCUS (pulling the slider to the right) is very good at eliminating midtone grays while maintaining shadow and highlight texture.  This is probably one of the most desirable features when using the Infinity Mask panel to convert color images to black and white.  The FOCUS slider provides a way to simultaneously control the two competing problems (too much gray and textureless highlights/shadows) mentioned earlier.

STRENGTH = White Point.  The STRENGTH slider determines the whiteness of the chosen tone and similar tones.  A value of 100 means that just the chosen tone is pure white.  Values less than 100 gray-down the whites, and values greater than 100 white-out nearby tones.  Leaving this slider set close to 100 is usually best.

Once these relationships between the Infinity Mask sliders and the black and white image are understood, some additional techniques become possible.  One of the most useful is to combine different infinity masks using different TONE settings into the final image.  While it’s sometimes possible to find one infinity mask that does a good job converting all tones in the image to black and white, it’s not always practical.  Different tones in the image may require, or at least work better, with a different black point, white point, and midtone contrast settings.  The Infinity Mask panel makes it possible to quickly make new masks that might work better for specific tones at specific tonal locations in the image.  The “Pixels” output of these masks can then be blended into the final image, sometimes using the “Pixels” output as a mask or selection to do the blending.  It’s even possible to create negative masks of the image and blend these into the positive and have them look completely natural.

This multi-tone blending technique was used to better control tones in two parts of the above image.  Alternate infinity masks starting with different TONE settings were created from the original color image, and these were then blended in using the “Pixels” output as a selection stencil for painting white on a black layer mask to reveal these tones.  The image below shows the final image without these additional blended masks and the rollover shows how the image looks more balanced with them blended in.


Starting to better understand how infinity masks could be used convert color images to black and white, I decide to try the technique on some finished color images.  This turned out to be somewhat easier since the tonal relationships had already been properly established in the developed color image.  It was relatively easy to make an initial “Pixels” output of an infinity mask of the image and then blend in a couple of additional infinity masks with different TONE settings to get the effect I wanted.  The image below shows the “Pixels” output of the original conversion of a color image to black and white.  The rollover is the final image with two additional infinity masks blended in.  The additional “Pixels” output layers help create better contrast in the grays in the canyon and the cloud.


The last image is another finished image that was converted to monochrome using the Infinity Mask panel.  This image illustrates the power of the color channels in the Infinity Mask panel.  The plug-in that runs the Infinity Mask panel has its own recipe for creating luminosity masks.  As a result, the color channel masks created by the panel don’t completely match the Red, Green, and Blue channel masks of Photoshop.  In fact, for black and white conversion, I think the Infinity Mask panel’s color channel masks are superior.  The Lights-1 versions of these channels offer some uniquely different interpretations of the image with higher contrast than the Photoshop color channels.  If the color image has some strong color elements and/or strong color differences, the Infinity Mask color channels nicely separate these colors into different tones. The R (Red) Infinity Mask channel was used to make the initial conversion of the image below.  The rollover shows the final image after some additional adjustments.


In summary, the TK Infinity Mask panel’s “Pixels” output option is a unique method for converting color images to black and white.  The sliders have some direct parallels to monochrome image processing.

  • TONE − Selects the image tone to display as white.
  • RANGE − Sets the black point.
  • FOCUS − Adjusts midtone contrast.
  • STRENGTH − Sets the white point.

Multiple “Pixels” output layers can be created to enhance specific tones in the image, and these can then be easily blended together to create the final monochrome image.  The color channels of the Infinity Mask panel also offer a surprisingly useful starting point to effectively exploit color variation for monochrome conversion.

TK Infinity Mask panel

July 27, 2016

For several months I’ve been working to expand the concept of the “Infinity Mask” first described in this blog post. An “infinity mask” is my term to describe a luminosity mask that has been further adjusted to more precisely select specific tones in the image. The “infinity” moniker comes from the fact that adjustments to the original mask are accomplished using a Photoshop Levels adjustment, which allows wide flexibility as to how the final mask actually looks. Granted, there may not be an infinite number of settings from which to choose when constructing an infinity mask, but there is certainly a huge new gamut of possible masks.

Feedback on the original infinity mask blog was very positive. Shortly after posting it I was contacted about the possibility of using a Photoshop plug-in to create these masks. The TK Infinity Mask panel is the result of this collaboration. It is shown below and offers a new method for working with pixel-based masks. The Photoshop plug-in that powers it has its own recipe for determining which pixels to include in the mask. The plug-in uses 32-bit floating point pixel-level data and is not restricted to just the luminosity values for individual pixels. Color channel data and even saturation data can be extracted from image pixels to create a new assortment of self-feathering masks that can then be “infinitely” refined.

TK Infinity Mask panel

The complete instructions PDF for the panel can be downloaded here. The most important features about the new panel are summarized below.

  1. The panel is mask-based. Like the Infinity Mask in the TKActions V4 panel, the user is seeing the mask in real time as they create the infinity mask that best suits their image. Having it visible helps insure that it correctly selects the intended image pixels as the mask is being manipulated by the panel.
  2. Different data channels can be accessed with one click. This is the top row of buttons on the panel. The plug-in can access Luminosity, red (R), green (G), blue (B), and Saturation data for all pixels. The panel then creates tonally feathered masks based of this data as it applies to these specific channels. The images below show what the different channels look like.Infinity Mask channels composite
    Infinity Mask channels composite
    Infinity Mask channels composite
  3. Presets (Darks-1,Pick, and Lights-1) are available in the second row. These are channel-specific. For the Luminosity, R (red),G (green), and B (blue) channels, the Lights-1 mask is a black and white positive of the image (shown above). The Darks-1 mask is a negative of the image. For the Saturation channel, the Lights-1 mask is a saturation mask (lighter values in the mask correspond to higher color saturation) and the Darks-1 mask is a vibrance mask (lighter values in the mask correspond to lower color saturation). The “Pick” option is the most sophisticated preset of all.  It opens the Color Picker to allow the user to click in their image. The plug-in extracts the pixel-level data of the area that was clicked and creates a mask specific to the chosen channel such that the clicked pixels are the brightest areas in the mask. If you’re familiar with the TKActions V4 panel, this would be like getting a matching Zone mask for any of the various Photoshop channel options at any point in the image.
  4. Sliders are used to adjust and fine-tune the mask (that is, to “infinitize” it). This is where the fun really starts. Once a preset button has been chosen, the sliders can be used to modify the mask in near real time depending on image size and computer speed and memory.
    • TONE−This slider changes the tone that shows as white in the mask. For Lights-1 the TONE is set at 255 and for Darks-1 the TONE is 0. The slider or input box allows for any tone from 0 to 255 to be chosen. But how do you know which tone to choose? That’s actually quite easy when you can see the mask  displayed on-screen. Just move the slider until the tones that need to be selected in the image are white in the mask. The on-screen mask updates every time the slider is moved. Or use the “Pick” button and select a tone directly from the image. The pick button automatically sets the TONE slider to match the tone that was clicked in the image.
    • RANGE−This slider determines the tonal width of the mask. As the range is narrowed by pulling the slider to the left, more pixels are excluded from the mask and the mask gets darker. The selected TONE, however, stays white.
    • FOCUS−This is a new feature for luminosity masks. The FOCUS slider increase midtone contrast in the mask, so the mask is less gray and more black-and-white as a result. The FOCUS slider addresses one of the common problems sometimes seen with luminosity masks, which is that they feather so perfectly that they bleed adjustments into parts of the image where no adjustment is intended. The FOCUS slider helps to prevent this. It increases midtone contrast in the mask while keeping the 50% gray value constant. When FOCUS is increased, there is more dark gray and black in the mask. As a result, adjustments bleed less beyond the selection border because they are more concealed by the mask. The panel also allows mask FOCUS to be decreased by pulling the slider to the left. This has the opposite effect. Midtone contrast in the mask is decreased, with the result being that adjustments through the mask bleed more into the surrounding pixels.
    • STRENGTH−This slider is essentially the white point for the mask. At the default setting of 100, only the chosen tone will be completely white. Moving the slider to the left makes it so the chosen tone is no longer pure white but a shade of gray. The other tones in the mask are adjusted proportionally. A STRENGTH value greater than 100 allows tones near the selected tone in the image to also start showing as pure white in the mask.
  5. Multiple output options. Once the on-screen infinity mask has been adjusted to the satisfaction of the photographer, the output buttons at the bottom of the panel provide options to deploy it.
    • Selection−Loads the infinity mask as an active selection.
    • Apply−Applies the infinity mask as a layer mask to the active layer on the Layers panel
    • Pixels−Creates a pixel layer of the infinity mask (more on this in a future blog post).
    • Channel−Duplicates the infinity mask as an alpha channel on the Channels panel.
    • Curves−Creates a Curves adjustment layer with the infinity mask as the layer mask.
    • B/C−Creates a Brightness/Contrast adjustment layer with the infinity mask as the layer mask.
    • H/S−Creates a Hue/Saturation adjustment layer with the infinity mask as the layer mask.
    • Levels−Creates a Levels adjustment layer with the infinity mask as the layer mask.

Summary: The TK Infinity Mask panel provides a new way to construct and adjust pixel-based masks in Photoshop. Luminosity masks, color channel masks, and saturation masks can all be managed from one panel. The mechanism for creating these masks is a plug-in that runs in the background.  It provides a visible mask based on the settings chosen by the user. The mask-based interface provides near real-time control of how the mask looks and ultimately which parts of the image will be revealed by it.

The TK Infinity Mask panel is available on the Special Offers page. The video below by Sean Bagshaw shows how the new panel can be used. The video can also be viewed here.

NOTE #1: I have contacted all customers I’m aware of who purchased the TKActions V4 panel for Photoshop CC to provide update options for the Infinity Mask panel. If you have the CC version of the V4 panel and have not heard from me, please check your junk/spam email or contact me for update information. If you purchased the V4 panel from Adobe Add-ons, please forward your purchase receipt (from FastSpring) or other proof of purchase as Adobe provides no information to me as to who purchased from their website.

NOTE#2: The TK Infinity Mask only works Photoshop CC in RGB Color mode. It does not work in Photoshop CS6

Classic Luminosity Masking

February 20, 2016
two-tone-with-paint

Since writing the first luminosity mask tutorial I’ve found countless uses for them and there are always new options to explore. For new users, though, it can sometimes be a bit daunting to know where to start.  Understanding the basics of using luminosity masks can be a good stepping stone to more complex applications. A recent image provided a straightforward example of why luminosity masks can be so valuable.  I’ll use it to review some basic concepts both in words and pictures.

Here are three important things to remember about luminosity masks:

  1. They select tones in the image, not individual elements. It helps when using them to start thinking “tonally” about what will be selected with a luminosity masks instead of trying to use them to make a precise selection of a specific part of the image. Luminosity masks work best in situations where tonal differences are well-defined instead of in situations where there are obvious pixel edges.
  2. The edges of luminosity masks are perfectly feathered for blending. These masks are created from the brightness values of individual pixels. Just as a photograph is a continuous-tone image, luminosity masks provide continuous-tone blending. Sometimes this feathering can be a bit too perfect, especially in the initial masks, bleeding an adjustment into even weakly selected tones. But it’s easy to narrow the tonal range selected using techniques in the original tutorial or using calculations for 16-bit luminosity masks. Some feathering is necessary and highly desirable for insuring perfect blending of any adjustment or other Photoshop maneuver into the rest of the image.
  3. They are incredibly precise when properly used. Tonal selection and perfect feathering make it possible to use luminosity masks to make extremely targeted adjustments. Painting through an active luminosity selection is perhaps the best way to take advantage of this since multiple brushstrokes can be applied to the same area, slowly building up the desired effect, while also insuring it blends flawlessly into the image.

The image below of a cloud from a clearing storm against a mountain background is the example I’ll use to illustrate these principles. This is the nearly finished version of the image. The main problem left to fix is that the cloud isn’t as well defined as it could be. It’s an accurate depiction of what was captured, but it lacks good textural quality because the tones, especially in the brightest areas on the left, are too close together to provide meaningful definition for the viewer. The cloud still needs some work to bring out the tonal texture that is present, but hidden in the brightest tones.

two-tone

But how to isolate the cloud for additional development? It doesn’t have any good edges. The wind-blown wisps along its outer portions would be a challenge to select with any standard Photoshop tool. And the hard edges created by these tools would be equally difficult to feather into the image. However, thinking tonally, the cloud is distinctly separate from its background, so the tonal selection provided by a luminosity mask would be ideal.

While there are an infinite number of luminosity masks, it’s usually easy to spot the right one. It’s the mask that is whitest in the areas of the desired adjustment and very dark in areas where no adjustment is required.  In this case, it was the Lights-3 mask (shown below). With this mask, the cloud clearly stands out from the background.

light-3

The red-overlay “view” mode (below) shows even more clearly how perfect this mask is. Not only is it more selected in the whitest areas of the clouds (darker red), but it also feathers very nicely to the edges of the cloud (lighter red). And, to top it off, there is no red in areas immediately adjacent to the cloud. So an adjustment using this mask will affect the whitest cloud areas most and feather perfectly to the wispy edges. There will also NOT be any haloing around the cloud caused by a poorly feathered selection. The luminosity mask will confine the adjustment to only those pixels where it’s needed. NOTE: The snow-covered mountain tops and upper cloud are also showing a small degree of selection (pale red) but it is a simple matter to paint these areas black in the final mask to exclude them from the adjustment made to the cloud.

light-3-red-mask

Once the mask is decided on, it can be added to an adjustment layer. For this image a Levels adjustment works well. It takes the targeted tones and easily adds contrast to create more texture in the cloud, especially the blob-like, white areas. The Properties panel for this adjustment is shown below.

properties

The image below shows the results. Rolling the mouse over this image shows what it looked like before this adjustment. (The rollover might not be visible in the email feed, but is visible on the blog website.)  It’s easy to see how the cloud (and only the cloud) has had its texture significantly improved.  This result displays one of the ideal qualities of luminosity masks, namely that they can separate tonal differences present at the pixel level which is nearly invisible to the eye. This is exactly what I was looking to do here, and the luminosity mask made it very easy.


This is a good start. The cloud shows improved tonal separation and is more congruent with the textural qualities present in the rest of the scene. However, this adjustment also had the unintended effect of graying-down the cloud. The tonal separation has been significantly improved, but some of the brilliance has been lost.

This now is a good example of a situation where painting through a luminosity selection (Luminosity Painting) makes a huge difference. This technique lets me selectively restore the crisp whites to the cloud by painting white onto a “Dodge” layer exactly where I want to add brightness. The luminosity selection controls which pixels receive paint and how much they receive.

LUMINOSITY MASK PEARL: The “7½” and “2½” zone selections are my initial go-to masks for removing this type of midtone grayness from an image. Painting white through a Zone-7½ selection lightens the lighter grays, but, because the very lightest tones in the image are subtracted off, it prevents blowing out the whites. The Zone-2½ selection does the same for the midtone darker grays. Painting black through the Zone-2½ selection darkens these grays, but, because the darkest blacks have been subtracted off, maintains enough texture to keep the details from going black. A 30% opacity brush is a good starting point, and plan on using multiple strokes to slowly build up the desired effect.

Painting white through a Zone-7½ selection in this case nicely targets the cloud without leading to a loss of texture in the brightest whites. It also prevents spilling paint onto the darker tones in the mountains behind the clouds. Some care is taken to use a brush size that allows paint to mostly fall on the gray clouds that need to be brightened and to allow selectively painting some areas multiple times.

The “Dodge” layer for this luminosity painting is a blank pixel layer set to Overlay blend mode. This painted layer, placed against a gray background, is shown below. It demonstrates how the Zone-7½ selection very nicely confines the white paint to the cloud and how I was able to add more paint to some areas to increase the effect exactly where I wanted it.

dodge-layer

The final image is shown below. The rollover is the image before luminosity painting.


In summary, this image, with its poorly separated cloud texture, is a classic situation for using luminosity masks. Three important luminosity principles were applied:

  1.  Think tonally−Choose luminosity masks in situations where there is adequate tonal separation which can be exploited to create a useful mask or selection.
  2. Find the right mask and feathering−Look for a mask that is clearly lighter in the areas that need adjustment compared to areas that should not be adjusted.
  3. Paint for precision−Use luminosity painting to precisely burn and dodge the image to create the proper tonal balance.

These concepts can be applied to other situations where luminosity masks are being considered as a tool for image development.

If you’d like to experiment with these techniques, a downsized-size jpg of this image without the adjustments described in this tutorial can be downloaded here.

Infinity Mask and Zone-Picker

October 17, 2015

Luminosity masks select tonal ranges in the image based on the brightness values of individual pixels. The original luminosity masks tutorial described how to use intersection and subtraction to create series of masks that targeted Light, Midtone, and Dark tonal ranges. Additional tonal ranges were added with zone masks, which used specific subtractions of the Lights and Darks masks. The recently released TKActions V4 panel uses calculations to make “16-bit” versions of these masks. These are all variations on the same theme, namely finding ways to select tones in the image for adjustment, painting, or blending.

The latest update to the TKActions V4 panel adds two new options: the Infinity MaskTM and the Zone-PickerTM. While these expand the ways for creating luminosity masks and selections, for some photographers they will also simplify the process of choosing which mask to use.

An Infinity Mask uses a Levels adjustment layer to simulate the Lights- and Darks-series luminosity masks. Which pixels are selected, how strongly (or weakly) they are selected, and the feathering from selected to non-selected pixels are all controlled in real-time by the user. Instead of a number of defined Lights and Darks masks, the possible number of luminosity masks created via the Levels dialog is infinite. Fortunately, the real-time environment for creating the Infinity Mask makes it possible to quickly narrow the selection to the pixels the photographer wants to control. The familiar white-reveals/black-conceals mask image is presented for evaluation, and adjustments to the Levels sliders instantly update the mask image.

Image for Infinity Masks

The image above is used to demonstrate the different set-ups for the Lights and Darks Infinity Mask. The illustrations below show how they work. (NOTE: While there is a lot of information in these diagrams, it is not necessary to memorize it. It’s only necessary to look at the on-screen mask image and adjust the sliders in the Levels dialog window in order to see and make the desired mask/selection.)

Infinity Lights. The on-screen image changes to the Lights-1 luminosity mask. Adjusting the black-point slider by moving it to the right (to choose the lower dark boundary for the selection) and midtone slider (to adjust the feathering) is usually sufficient to create the desired selection. There are additional adjustments available as describe below. Clicking “OK” in the Levels dialog window creates a mask and corresponding selection to match what is being viewed on the monitor.

Infinity Lights

Infinity Darks. The on-screen image changes to the Darks-1 luminosity mask. Adjusting the white-point slider by moving it to the left (to choose the upper light boundary for the selection) and midtone slider (to adjust the feathering) is usually sufficient to create the desired selection. There are additional adjustments available as describe below. Clicking “OK” in the Levels dialog window creates a mask and corresponding selection to match what is being viewed on the monitor.

Infinity Darks

The Zone-Picker helps take the guesswork out of finding the right off-center midtone mask to target specific tones in the image. It uses Photoshop’s Color Picker tool. When the Color Picker opens after clicking the Zone-Picker button, the Eye Dropper tool becomes active allowing the user to choose a color/tone from the image. Once chosen, clicking OK runs an action that automatically chooses among 23 different tonal zones to find the one that most closely matches the chosen tone/color. The available choices are similar to the zone and half-zone buttons on the Spectrum tab of the V4 panel, but a bit narrower and more focused. The luminosity masks/selections created by the Zone-Picker are NOT simulated luminosity masks. They are calculated directly from Lights- and Darks-series masks, and so are themselves 16-bit luminosity masks based entirely on the pixel brightness values of the image.

Adobe Color Picker

The Zone-Picker dialog window itself can be used to choose a color/tone instead of selecting a color/tone from the image. In fact, the dialog window allows two new series masks to be created. Picking pure white (255, 255, 255) produces a Lights-6 selection/mask and picking pure black (0,0,0) produces a Darks-6 selection/mask.

Sean Bagshaw has recorded a video on how to use an Infinity Mask and the Zone-Picker. His application is slightly different from how I describe their use and application, which speaks to their adaptability in different workflows.

The Infinity Mask and the Zone-Picker are additional ways to select tones in the image for painting, blending, and adjustment. These functions have been added to the Photoshop CC 2014/2015 version of the TKActions V4 panel. They will eventually be added to the CS6 version of the panel too, though it will take some time in order to include additional planned updates.

Spectrum Tab V4 panel

NOTE: I’ve added a direct purchase link to the CC version of the TKActions V4 panel on my special offers page instead of linking to the Adobe Add-Ons website to get it. I continue to update the Adobe Add-Ons product with the current version, but Add-Ons has proven unreliable and I can no longer recommend it for the initial acquisition. When it works, Add-Ons is great, but when it doesn’t, the various workarounds are time-consuming and more trouble than most people want to deal with.

The newest CC version of the TKActions V4 panel also has a few other changes:

  1. The Burn/Dodge layers are no longer filled with 50% gray. They are transparent, which allows the painted pixels on the layer to be loaded as a selection and used for additional adjustments. Sean Bagshaw discusses the process in this video: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=MCeZtmjjvXs.
  2. Layer bookmarking has been added. When actions in the panel require adding layers at the top of the Layers panel, the action automatically returns the user to the layer they were on before the temporary layers were added when the action is finished. This is most important with the “+/- View” button. A round trip using “+/- View” leaves the user back on their original layer to immediately start painting through the selection or to create a layer mask after finding the right selection.
  3. The “+/- View” button should now work in Lab mode as well as RGB mode. The color is a little more intense, but it still works.
  4. The mask generated by the “+/- View” button can now be toggled from red to blue. An extra layer has been added in view mode. Turning “on” the visibility of this layer changes the red overlay mask to a blue mask. This is for people that have a hard time seeing the red overlay.

Blue overlay mask

NOTE: The phrases “Infinity Mask” and “Zone-Picker” were coined by Tony Kuyper and are trademarks of his products− Infinity MaskTM and Zone-PickerTM.

TKActions V4 — A New Panel for Luminosity Masks and Beyond

July 8, 2015

I’m pleased to announce a new TKActions panel for Photoshop. This is the fourth version of this custom luminosity mask panel (V4) and has been completely rebuilt. It takes advantage of new capabilities in Photoshop extension panels–smaller footprint, smarter buttons, updated interface, and more features–to provide users a practical and efficient way to add luminosity masks to their workflow.

TKActions V4 panel

The top part of the panel is a Photoshop control center. It executes many common menu commands and keyboard short cuts with the click of a button. Most of the usual steps for developing an image can be accessed from here.

The bottom of the panel has three tabs. The Spectrum tab provides a new interface for creating luminosity masks. The widths of the buttons in this section roughly match the tonal ranges that will be selected in the image. Standard luminosity masks (Lights/Darks/Midtones) as well as subtracted and zone masks can now all be created with a single click.

In addition to the Spectrum tab, the bottom of the panel also has an Actions and Basic tab. The Actions tab has several useful functions for enhancing the image and a web-sharpening section for preparing images for jpeg output that has been completely redesigned. The Basic tab provides an alternate interface for using luminosity masks with Curves and Levels adjustment layers and as Channel masks and selections.

TKActions V4 panel

A partial list of new features and improvements in the V4 panel includes:

  • 16-bit luminosity masks−These were discussed in previous blog posts.
  • Spectrum selection−Creates ALL masks, including zone and subtracted masks, that were available in the previous version 3 panel.
  • Integrated actions−No more action sets to install on Photoshop’s regular Actions panel.
  • Smart buttons−Panel buttons monitor the Photoshop workflow and only fire at the right time.
  • Toggle buttons−Allows one button to perform multiple tasks.
  • Active selection indicator−Keeps track of when there is an active selection even if the marching ants aren’t visible.
  • Updated web-sharpening−No more fixed-dimensions. Users can enter their preferred dimension from 100 to 3000 pixels and easily tailor the level of sharpening to their taste.
  • Condensed history−No more scrolling histories for buttons that execute multiple steps. One button, one click, one entry on the History panel, Ctrl/Command-Z to undo it.
  • Tonal Clarity−A saturation-neutral method for enhancing detail and structure in an image.
  • One-click Photoshop control−Many Photoshop menu commands and keyboard shortcuts can now be accessed from a color-coded interface for more efficient image processing.
  • Midpoint rollovers−Choose among the different luminosity masks based on tones sampled from the image.
  • Rapid clear channels−Quickly remove all alpha channels from the Channels panel to decrease file size and memory use.
  • Creative Cloud installation−Once acquired, the new panel and future updates are automatically installed on computers signed in to the Creative Cloud desktop application (see this video and this one).

The new V4 panel is designed to help take the guesswork out of luminosity masks and make them more accessible than ever. It’s also meant to make other actions and tools more available to allow photographers to creatively develop their images. My website has additional information. The complete Instructions PDF can be downloaded and covers all aspects of the panel. Sean Bagshaw has also recorded a corresponding video series called the Video Guide to TKActions that explains the new panel in detail. Samples can be found below.

Purchase options for the new panel and videos are on the Special Offers page. A German version of the panel and accompanying videos are available on André Distel’s website.

Free Panel to Make 16-bit Luminosity Masks

June 4, 2015

Lately I’ve been experimenting with several features that could make Photoshop extension panels easier to install and use. To test some of these new elements, I’ve created a mini-panel (image below) focused on just making 16-bit luminosity masks, like the downloadable actions that were available in the previous blog posts. With the new custom panel these same actions can now be run with a click of a button instead of having to play them from Photoshop’s regular Actions panel. The new panel can be downloaded free at this website.

TK-mini panel

It’s a very simple panel overall and provides the easiest way yet to quickly generate the Lights, Darks, and Midtones series of luminosity masks using the new 16-bit process. The luminosity masks generated are placed on the Channels panel, so check there for the results after clicking one of the buttons. Luminosity masks can do many things, and it’s up to the user to determine which mask they want to use and how to use it for their image. Techniques for using luminosity masks are described in the tutorials section of my website.

The CC and CS6 versions look slightly different, but do the same thing. They also have slightly different installation procedures. The complete Instructions PDF describes how to install the panel, how to use it, and also has some trouble-shooting tips. Please take a few minutes to read it before installing the panel to help insure that the process goes smoothly.

Once installation is complete on any compatible version of Photoshop, open Photoshop and click through the menu commands Window > Extensions > TK. The panel should appear. Once available, it can be opened, closed, and docked to a panels bar just like over Photoshop panels. An image needs to be open for most of the buttons to work.

This is my first experience with the new features and distribution method. If there are problems, please let me know. We can try and work them out together.

16-bit Luminosity Masks: Do they make a difference?

May 13, 2015

In the last blog post I described a new “calculations” method for making luminosity masks entirely within a 16-bit workflow for 16-bit images. The tonal ranges selected by the calculations method match those of the intersection method, but 16-bit masks and selections are smoother (less tonal variation) than their 8-bit counterparts upon close inspection. So the question can fairly be asked (and was asked in the comments on the last post) whether this new method actually makes a difference? Is there a visible advantage when using 16-bit luminosity masks instead of 8-bit masks?

The answer is: Probably not. In theoretical situations, which I’ll try to show, it’s possible to produce some differences, but producing similar differences in an actual image is harder. Even the theoretical differences are hard to illustrate in a WordPress blog like this. Jpeg images saved at the highest setting are further compressed by the website’s software effectively obscuring the subtle differences that can be seen on a monitor. To enhance the differences, I’ll also be using image rollovers. Flicking the mouse back and forth across the image edge will switch between the 8-bit and 16-bit adjustment. If you’re reading this in an email feed, the rollovers probably won’t work, so you’ll need to visit the actual blog to see them.

Before getting started it’s worth noting that conventional 8-bit luminosity masks, since their introduction in the 2006 tutorial, have become standard practice for many photographers. If there was an obvious problem with them, these masks would NOT have been become so widely accepted, integrated, duplicated, YouTube-ated (videated?), or appropriated since then. They’re now recognized as a unique Photoshop tool to blend, adjust, paint, and develop images to suit the photographer’s individual style. Other photographers wishing to demonstrate and promote their own expertise in luminosity masks have adopted the 2006-process for creating them. 16-bit masks represent an advancement, I think, in the way luminosity masks are created, but their role in actually improving images is still undecided.

I’m not aware of any problems in my images that resulted from using traditional 8-bit luminosity masks, but based on my experiments with a 16-bit tonal gradient I can create two situations where there is a theoretical advantage to using 16-bit masks.

1) Severe adjustments though the most selected pixels. To illustrate this, a 600-px by 300-px 16-bit tonal gradient was used to generate a Lights-5 (Ultra Lights) mask via both the 8-bit and 16-bit methods. The full-size gradient and equivalent Lights-5 selection is shown below. NOTE: This is a completely smooth gradient on my monitor and any visible banding is a result of jpeg compression.

Gradient with selection

The Lights-5 mask is incorporated into a Curves adjustment layer over the background gradient. The curve is then adjusted (Properties panel below) to pull the whitest value (255,255,255) down to almost black (20,20,20).

255 to 20 Curves adjustment

The gradient with this adjustment applied through the 16-bit mask is shown below. The rollover shows the same adjustment through the 8-bit mask. There’s not much difference, but if you look closely you might see some subtle banding on the far right side for the adjustment through the 8-bit mask.



By increasing the magnification to 200%, screen-capturing the result, and then saving it as a jpeg at maximum resolution, the difference now starts to show more prominently. The image below is the 2x screen capture (a right-sided quadrant of the above image) for adjustment through the 16-bit mask. The rollover is the adjustment through the 8-bit mask identically enlarged. Now there IS an obvious difference. The 8-bit adjustment is showing some definite tonal banding, but the 16-bit adjustment remains totally smooth (except for slight banding introduced by jpeg compression).


This is, of course, a totally unrealistic adjustment (255 to 20) for any image and an unrealistic viewing resolution (actual pixels x2). But it’s necessary to show what a difference between 8-bit and 16-bit luminosity masks might look like. One interesting thing worth pointing out here is that even though this extreme adjustment would never be made to an image and would never be viewed at this resolution, the 16-bit adjustment still remains tonally smooth in the adjusted area. Conclusion: 16-masks are essentially indestructible. While the adjustment through the 8-bit mask eventually cracks under the pressure of extreme adjustment and 2x magnification, the adjustment through the 16-bit mask remains completely uniform even in this impossibly theoretical scenario.

2) Significant enlargement. The requirement to use a 2x enlargement to see an obvious difference in the first example points to the second situation where 16-bit masks might show an advantage: significant enlargement. To illustrate this, a less severe adjustment (255 to 192, image below) is made to the tonal gradient, again using the Lights-5 mask.

255 to 192 Curves adjustment

After adjustment using the 16-bit luminosity mask, the gradient looks like the image below. The rollover shows the same adjustment through the 8-bit Lights-5 luminosity mask. In this case, the adjustment is not sufficient to show any obvious difference between the two methods at this actual-pixel resolution.


If this gradient image is enlarged significantly (5x for this example) and viewed at actual-pixel resolution, the tonal banding can once again can be seen. In this case I used “Bicubic Sharper” as the resample method for enlargement to sharpen and enhance any differences that might exist. A segment of the enlargement that includes the tones farthest to the right in the gradient after adjustment is shown below. This is the adjustment through the 16-bit mask. The rollover shows the same adjustment and enlargement through the 8-bit mask. The difference is slight because the adjustment is less extreme, but there is definitely some tonal banding visible in the adjustment through the 8-bit mask that isn’t visible for the adjustment through the 16-bit mask.


While this adjustment is more within the realm of possibility than the last one, it would still be very rare that the whites in the image would be pulled down this much.

An actual image. Of these two examples, the first one that involved severe adjustment is where the 16-bit mask made the most visible difference. So it’s probably worth doing something similar to an actual image to see what happens, though the results of such a similarly extreme adjustment will produce undesirable aesthetic results. In this example the white values will again be dragged down to 20 using a Curves adjustment layer though a 16-bit and 8-bit luminosity mask. The Lights-4 mask will be used in this case in order to include enough pixels to actually see a significant change in the image.

255 to 20 Curves adjustment

Below is the a jpeg of the image that was used for this demonstration. The rollover shows the image after the adjustment. The full-size image measures 5616-px by 3744-px. The green box shows the area of the original image that is enlarged below.


This is obviously another unrealistic adjustment, but, as seen above, it takes something this extreme to produce a visible difference between 8-bit and 16-bit luminosity masks.

Below is a screen shot of the green-box area adjustment through the 16-bit Lights-4 mask viewed at 200% magnification, which is twice as magnified as actual pixels (actual pixels x2). The rollover is the same area with the same adjustment except done through an 8-bit Lights-4 mask.


In this situation there is barely any difference, and certainly none of the obvious tonal banding that was seen with the severe adjustment to the smooth gradient in the first example. You might be able to see a little better definition in the noise in the grayed-down sky of the “8-bit” image, but given the magnitude of the overall adjustment, this difference is tiny.

But why is this? Where is the expected tonal banding in the 8-bit adjustment? I can’t say for sure, but I have a theory. A perfectly smooth tonal gradient, like that used in the examples above, doesn’t really exist in a digital photograph. It’s only something that can be created in Photoshop. In a digital photograph the natural noise and the color variation captured by the camera’s sensor takes the place of the smooth gradation of the Photoshop gradient. These pixel-level, sensor-captured tonal dissimilarities, which are smooth and essentially invisible when looking at the image at any normal viewing resolution, are exaggerated upon severe adjustment though a luminosity mask. So instead of tonal banding with severe adjustment, this natural “grain” just gets “grainier.” It accommodates the tonal changes that accompany a severe adjustment through a luminosity mask (takes the place of banding), and appears to be about the same regardless of whether the luminosity mask is created via the 8-bit or 16-bit method. In other words, instead of tonal banding, an actual image shows tonal “graining” with severe adjustment, which looks similar to noise. The increase in tonal noise/grain is probably a bit more pronounced with 8-bit masks than with 16-bit masks, but because it’s at the pixel level (like luminosity masks) and not in prominent bands, it’s hard to actually see any difference.

The image below attempts to show this increase in grain/noise. It’s a screen capture at 300% zoom (actual pixels x3) of a not-too-grainy-but-not-quite-pure-white area of the sky in another part of the image that is affected by the adjustment. (It’s just to the left of the green-boxed area in the jpeg of the entire image.) The rollover shows how much grainier/noisier this area becomes after the severe adjustment through the 16-bit mask. Severe adjustment of the pixel-level tonal variations that come with digital capture and which are sorted out and enhanced by luminosity masks account for this enhanced grain/noise at this magnification. It happens even with the severe adjustment through the 16-bit mask, which is shown here, but is not nearly as obvious as the tonal banding seen in the gradient examples above. It’s also worth remembering that 16-bit masks are so perfectly matched to the tones in the image that even severe adjustments blend in smoothly. So this graining effect, which is visible at this magnification and occurs with both 8-bit and 16-bit masks, would not be visible in the image itself, especially if the tonal adjustment was more reasonable.


Conclusion. The examples in this blog looked at how a smooth 16-bit Photoshop-generated gradient reacts differently when adjusted through 8-bit and 16-bit luminosity masks. In theoretical situations at magnified viewing resolutions some noticeable differences can be seen. However, similar changes would be significantly less visible in actual digital photographs even at exaggerated viewing resolutions or enlargement because very small tonal differences captured by the camera’s sensor provide enough tonal variation to obscure the expected banding that was seen in the theoretical examples. Some combination of multiple or severe adjustments through 8-bit luminosity masks on smooth tonal areas of an image combined with significant enlargement might produce a noticeable effect in certain circumstance. But it will likely take nose-to-the-image viewing or monitor magnification to actually see it. For most images with routine processing and enlargement it simply won’t exist, especially in areas with lots of detail or structure. I have repeated the experiment using severe adjustments using both Midtone and Darks luminosity masks and have also done the same adjustments on different images. The 8-bit grain/noise with extreme adjustment is more apparent in some images, but it takes at least 300% magnification (400% is better) to appreciate any difference between 8-bit and 16-bit luminosity masks.

Other Considerations. There are some additional variables that could come into play when working on actual images. For example, it’s important not to overlook the fact that the smooth blending inherent with luminosity masks allows adjustments to be pushed further than would normally look natural, so a critical “severe adjustment” threshold might actually be reached or exceeded in certain circumstances. Also, the quality of the sensor data could play a role. Better (smoother) data might increase the likelihood of seeing banding instead of graining. (NOTE: Lens quality might also influence the sensor data and my consumer-grade zoom lens might have different results than a professional prime lens.) And perhaps other luminosity mask techniques have different outcomes. Only adjustment through a mask on an adjustment layer was investigated here. Maybe exposure blending, mask painting, or luminosity painting will show a more pronounced effect. Still, any improvement with using 16-bit luminosity masks is likely to be subtle at best. In almost all situations, images developed using 8-bit luminosity masks will likely look just as good (or identical) as those made with 16-bit masks.

The future of 16-bit luminosity masks. I admit to being somewhat disappointed that the advantages of 16-bit luminosity masks seen in the gradient experiments ended up being less evident in actual images. While my use doesn’t indicate a breakthrough improvement from using 16-bit luminosity masks, perhaps the experience of other photographers will be different. I still intend to incorporate the new process into my custom panel in the near future. Creating 16-bit luminosity masks using Photoshop actions takes no more computer processing time than using the traditional method so there’s no reason not to use the best method available, even if the advantages are just theoretical for the most part at this time. If you’d like to practice with 16-bit masks now, a free download of an action set to create them is available here. If you do come up with an example where 16-bit masks are clearly superior when making “reasonable” adjustments, please let me know. I’d like to post or link to the results in order to have a good reason to recommend 16-bit masks as the new standard.

%d bloggers like this: